Sitting Series 5: Be One with Your Chair

Read Time: 2 min
man rounded forward and working at computer

The problem with using the back of your chair is that you start with good intentions—of leaving your back resting against the back of the chair—then before you know it, your attention has literally pulled you forward in the direction of…

  • your computer as you work on your document
  • the juicy novel you’re engrossed in
  • the steering wheel as you drive in rush hour
  • the friend you’re talking to across the table at lunch

You end up with a situation where your lower back is against the back of the chair and you’ve curled forward from the waist, head and neck leading, toward the object of your attention.

Sort of nut shaped.

Over time, that nut shape puts a lot of stress on your neck and back. Continue reading “Sitting Series 5: Be One with Your Chair”

An Exercise for Office Workers

Read Time: 2 min
man working at desk

A few weeks ago, I was interviewed by a marketing rep for an ergonomic office furniture company.

We had a great conversation about the modern office environment, the Alexander Technique and posture.

At the end of the interview he asked me if I could share one exercise for office workers to do to at their workstations to help with their posture.

Sure, I said.
Continue reading “An Exercise for Office Workers”

The Space Between

Read Time: 3 min
woman in red dress standing in meadow with arms outstretched

“Good posture is spready instead of squished,” is the sage advice of my colleague Lindsay Newitter’s 9-year-old daughter.

The 9-year-old’s quote was part of an article on stress, posture and the Alexander Technique that appeared in the New York Times last August.

How do you think of good posture? Often we think of an optimal shape or position we need to get into instead of a quality, such as a quality of being more “spready”, to quote my colleague’s daughter again.

But how do you achieve a more “spready” quality to your posture? Continue reading “The Space Between”