Lighten Up

Read Time: 2 min
white feather

Here is an experiment to try.

I am going to ask you to do something. And that something is to go for a walk.

So, find a large enough space where you have room to walk around comfortably for about 30 seconds. Heck if its nice out, go outside.

Although you are going to walk in this experiment, the experiment is not so much about the activity of walking per se—it is about how changing what you think may change your experience of the activity of walking.

You are going to go for a walk three times.

Each time for 30 seconds.

Each time you are going to think a different instruction for your posture.

Continue reading “Lighten Up”

The Space Between

Read Time: 3 min
woman in red dress standing in meadow with arms outstretched

“Good posture is spready instead of squished,” is the sage advice of my colleague Lindsay Newitter’s 9-year-old daughter.

The 9-year-old’s quote was part of an article on stress, posture and the Alexander Technique that appeared in the New York Times last August.

How do you think of good posture? Often we think of an optimal shape or position we need to get into instead of a quality, such as a quality of being more “spready”, to quote my colleague’s daughter again.

But how do you achieve a more “spready” quality to your posture? Continue reading “The Space Between”

Head Up Eyes Forward

Read Time: 3 min
toddler walking toward camera

I read a story recently about someone’s first experience with the Alexander Technique. It was many years ago, and he had come across a poster advertising an introductory workshop.

The workshop was titled “HEAD UP EYES FORWARD: An Introduction to the Alexander Technique.”

He went to the workshop. I think that he eventually went on to train to be an Alexander Teacher. What impressed me about the story was that all these years later he remembered the four words on the poster. Continue reading “Head Up Eyes Forward”